Festival 2017

At a glance

Adam Rutherford & Rohan Silva: A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived

5 December 2016 - 12:38pm -- miranda
Festival EventsMonday, February 27

Adam Rutherford & Rohan Silva: A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived

Kings Place, Hall 2

£10.50
2017-02-27 19:00:00

19:00

Adam Rutherford
Chair: Rohan Silva

This event took place on Monday 27th February 2017 as part of Jewish Book Week 2017. To watch a video of this event, click here.

In A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, Adam Rutherford tells the story of you and how you came to be. In every one of our genomes we carry the history of our species – births, deaths, disease, war, famine, migration and a lot of sex – so this is also our collective story.

In a captivating journey through the expanding landscape of genetics, Adam Rutherford subverts many of our preconceptions. He traces where humankind has passed through or put down roots, uncovering the genetic kinship in all our footfalls. Rutherford reveals what our genes can tell us, what they should be able to tell us, and what they can never fully explain. He talks to Rohan Silva, co-founder of Second Home.

Sponsored by Hanna and Robin Klein.

Adam Rutherford

Adam Rutherford is a science writer and broadcaster. He studied genetics at University College London, and during his PhD on the developing eye, he was part of a team that identified the first genetic cause of a form of childhood blindness. He has written and presented many award-winning series and programmes for the BBC, including the flagship BBC Radio 4 programme Inside Science, The Cell for BBC Four, and Playing God, as well as writing for the Observer. His first book, Creation, on the origin of life and synthetic biology, was published to outstanding reviews and was shortlisted for the Wellcome Trust Prize. 

Rohan Silva

Rohan Silva is a former special advisor to the UK Prime Minister, Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Index Ventures, and is now one of two co-founders of Second Home.  He is a Fellow of the UK’s Royal Society of the Arts and is credited with driving some of the UK government’s most digital-friendly policies.