London’s International Festival of Arts and Ideas

Festival 2017

At a glance

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Dan Cruickshank: Spitalfields: The History of a Nation in a Handful of Streets

5 December 2016 - 4:05pm -- miranda
Festival EventsWednesday, March 1

Dan Cruickshank: Spitalfields: The History of a Nation in a Handful of Streets

Kings Place, Hall 1

£10.50

19:00

Dan Cruickshank
Chair: Rachel Lichtenstein

Religious strife, civil conflict, waves of immigration, the rise and fall of industry, great prosperity and grinding poverty – the handful of streets that constitute modern Spitalfields have witnessed all this and more. In a fascinating evocation of one of London’s most distinctive districts, Dan Cruickshank tells the story of the people who have lived there from Roman times right up to the present, describing the transformation of the Spitalfields he first encountered in the 1970s – a war-damaged collection of semi-derelict houses – to the vibrant community it is today. In conversation with author Rachel Lichtenstein.

Dan Cruickshank

Dan Cruickshank is an eminent architectural historian and television presenter. His recent works include the television programmes and accompanying books, The Country House Revealed and Dan Cruickshanks’s Adventures in Architecture. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects and on the Architectural Panel of the National Trust and has lived in Spitalfields for 40 years. 

Rachel Lichtenstein

Rachel Lichtenstein is the author of several books, including Diamond Street: The Hidden World of Hatton Garden and, most recently, ​Estuary. Trained as a sculptor, her work has been exhibited in venues including the Whitechapel Gallery, the Barbican, the British Library, Woodstreet Galleries in Pittsburgh in the USA, and the Jerusalem Theatre in Israel. From 2002 to 2004, she was the British Library's first Pearson Creative Research Fellow.