Ayelet Gundar-Goshen

Ayelet Gundar-Goshen is an Israeli psychologist, author and script writer. Her film scripts have won prizes at international festivals, including the Berlin Today Award and the New York City Short Film Festival Award. One Night Markovitch, her first novel, won the prestigious Sapir Prize for best debut.

Ayelet Gundar-Goshen – One Night, Markovitch
Together with Pushkin Press, Jewish Book Week is delighted to launch the English edition of Ayelet Gundar-Goshen’s One Night, Markovitch, a colourful debut novel tracing the destinies of a group of young people on the eve of WWII. Ayelet Gundar-Goshen will be talking to author and analyst JoshCohen about her characters and exploring some of the strengths and weaknesses behind the Zionist narrative. The book’s fil...
Waking Lions and Chains of Sand
Rapidly following her acclaimed debut One Night Markowitz, Ayelet Gundar-Goshen’s second novel, Waking Lions, is a gripping, suspenseful and morally devastating drama that looks at the darkness inside all of us. Jemma Wayne, whose debut novel, After, Before, was longlisted for the distinguished Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction, joins Ayelet Gundar-Goshen and Josh Glancy to talk about her forthcoming...
Philip Roth: His Life and Legacy

‘Literature isn’t a moral beauty contest’, claimed Roth, ‘The belief it inspires is what counts.’ Literary titan and multi-award winning writer, Philip Roth was undoubtedly a brilliant, if controversial, artist. In a career that spanned 50 years he wrote numerous, generation-changing books, from his first, Goodbye, Columbus, to his last, Nemesis. Three outstanding writers discuss his work and his legacy.

The Creation of a Female Writer
Is the novel an inherently feminine form? And is it a distinctive thing to be a female novelist or is that in itself a misogynistic idea? Focusing on the writing that best illustrates their careers, Tracy Chevalier, Ayelet Gundar-Goshen and Fay Weldon — with literary critic and token male Sam Leith — explore these and other questions such as: where do the voices in their fiction come from, and what does it give them (and take away)? Do they feel connected to fellow female novelists, liv...