Sarah Churchwell

Sarah Churchwell is Professor of American Literature and Chair of Public Understanding of the Humanities at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. She is the author of Careless People: Murder, Mayhem and The Invention of The Great Gatsby and The Many Lives of Marilyn Monroe. Her literary journalism has appeared widely and she comments regularly on arts, culture, and politics for television and radio. She has judged many literary prizes, including the 2017 Baillie Gifford Prize for Nonfiction, the 2014 Man Booker Prize for Fiction, and she was a co-winner of the 2015 Eccles British Library Writer’s Award.

Gary Shteyngart Little Failure
Little Failure Ð the alarming pet-name given to the young Gary Shteyngart by his father when growing up in pre-Glasnost Russia Ð is a remarkable immigrant memoir. A candid and poignant story of a Soviet familyÕs trials and tribulations, and of their 1979 escape to the consumerised promised land of the United States, it is also an exceptionally funny account of the authorÕs transformation from asthmatic Moscow toddler to 40-something Manhattanite with a receding hairline and a memoir to wr...
Gary Shteyngart Little Failure
Judy Blume: In the Unlikely Event
Jewish Book Week was delighted to present the wonderful Judy Blume in a special event. Judy Blume spoke about her life in books and her brand new adult novel, In the Unlikely Event, with Sarah Churchwell on Sunday, 12 July at 6.00 pm at Kings Place. In this, her first adult novel for over 15 years, Judy Blume imagines and weaves together the lives of three generations of families, friends and strangers affected in a multiplicity of ways by a series of airplane crashes i...
Are we Witnessing the Death of Democracy?
Tolerance, equality, democracy, free speech, a free press, separation of church and state, progress: these and other values of the Enlightenment have guided the West for over 300 years. But with trends such as the rise of populism and nationalism in the West, the ascent of China in the East, and the failure of the Arab Spring, many are asking: what if the Enlightenment was just a blip? What if we are simply reverting to ‘norm’ of human history and, if so, what can we do about it? ...