Genesis: Emerging Writers

Tracy Chevalier, Sophie Herxheimer, Sam Leith, Benjamin Markovits, A.D. Miller, Caroline Moorehead, George Prochnik, Kavita Puri, George Szirtes

06/03/2022 12:15 pm
Kings Place, Limehouse

Join us for a free event celebrating our cohort of writers and mentors from the inaugural Genesis-JBW Emerging Writers Programme. Writers of fiction, non-fiction and poetry have been working one-on-one with mentors to develop writing projects with the theme of ‘Beginnings’. Mentors include Tracy Chevalier, George Szirtes, Kavita Puri, Sam Leith, Benjamin Markovits, A.D. Miller, Sophie Herxheimer, Caroline Moorehead, Cathy Rentzenbrink and George Prochnik

We would especially like to welcome anyone considering applying for the 2022 Emerging Writers Programme, as the 2021 cohort discuss their experience and read from their work.

Fringe events are free and unticketed

Tracy Chevalier


Tracy Chevalier is a Washington-born prize-winning novelist. Her recent projects include not only her new novel, At the Edge of the Orchard, but also another novel inspired by Othello for the Hogarth Press, and editing – as well as contributing to – Reader, I Married Him, a collection of original short-stories inspired by Jane Eyre.

Sophie Herxheimer


Sophie Herxheimer is an award-winning writer, artist and poet who teaches and collaborates extensively. She has held residencies for LIFT, Southbank Centre and Transport for London and her recent publications include The Listening Forest, The New Concrete and Voyage. She lives in Brixton with her family.

Sam Leith


Sam Leith is literary editor at the Spectator, a columnist at the Financial Times and Prospect, and his work appears regularly in the Guardian, The Times and the TLS among others. His books include You Talkin' to Me? Rhetoric from Aristotle to Obama.

Benjamin Markovits


Benjamin Markovits grew up in Texas, London and Berlin. He is the author of seven novels and has published essays, stories, poetry and reviews in The GuardianGrantaThe Paris Review and The New York Times among other publications. He lives in London and teaches at Royal Holloway, University of London.

A.D. Miller


A.D. Miller is the author of Snowdrops, The Earl of Petticoat Lane and The Faithful Couple. Snowdrops was a bestseller and was shortlisted for many prizes including the Man Booker and the CWA Gold Dagger. It was translated into 25 languages. As Moscow Correspondent of The Economist A.D. Miller has travelled across the former Soviet Union and covered the Orange Revolution in Ukraine; he is now the magazine’s Culture Editor based in London. His new novel Independence Square, a tale of revolution and betrayal set between Kiev and London, is published in February.

Caroline Moorehead


Caroline Moorehead is the biographer of Bertrand Russell, Freya Stark, Iris Origo and Martha Gellhorn. Her book on the French Resistance, Village of Secrets, was a Sunday Times bestseller and was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize in 2014. Her 2017 book A Bold and Dangerous Family was shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award, and her most recent book A House in the Mountains: the Women Who Liberated Italy from Fascism was published in November. She lives in London.

George Prochnik


George Prochnik’s essays, poetry and fiction have appeared in numerous journals. He is editor-at-large for Cabinet Magazine and won the National Jewish Book Award for The Impossible Exile.

Kavita Puri


Kavita Puri is an award-winning journalist and radio broadcaster. Her landmark three-part series Partition Voices for BBC Radio 4 won the Royal Historical Society's Radio and Podcast Award and its overall Public History Prize. Her critically-acclaimed Radio 4 series, Three Pounds in My Pocket, charted the migration of South Asians to post-war Britain. Kavita works in BBC Current Affairs as an executive producer, and radio presenter. Prior to this, she worked at Newsnight. She studied Law at Cambridge University. @kavpuri Image cr Jonathan Ring

George Szirtes


A child refugee from Hungary in 1956, George Szirtes lives in the UK and published his first book of poems, The Slant Door, in 1979. It won the Faber Prize. He has published many since then, his collection, Reel, winning the T S Eliot Prize in 2004 for which he has been twice shortlisted since. His latest book is Fresh Out of the Sky (Bloodaxe 2021). Beside his English prizes he has been awarded various international ones for his own poetry and for his translations of Hungarian poetry and fiction, including The European Poetry Translation Prize, the Best Translated Book Prize in the USA and the Man Booker International Translation Prize for his work on the novels of László Krasznahorkai. His second book for children, In the Land of the Giants won the CLPE Prize for the best book of poems for children in 2012. He has written reviews and articles for major newspapers, programmes for the BBC and has edited a variety of books. His recent work with composers and performers includes poems for The Voice Project and the carol set by Richard Causton for the BBC broadcast Service of Carols at King’s College Chapel in 2015. His memoir of his mother, The Photographer at Sixteen, was awarded the James Tait Black Prize for Biography in 2020.