George Prochnik: Reflections on Stefan Zweig and Exile

George Prochnik

05/02/2015
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George Prochnik’s family fled Austria in the 1930s, at the same time as Stefan Zweig turned his back on Vienna for the last time. In The Impossible Exile: Stefan Zweig at the End of the World, Prochnik muses on the consequences of exile for Zweig and other émigré writers, such as Thomas Mann, Hannah Arendt and Bertolt Brecht, tracing Zweig’s tumultuous journey to his final destination, Brazil. George Prochnik talks to Erica Wagnerabout the dramatic effects of exile on Zweig, other writers, and his own family.

In association with the Austrian Cultural Forum, London

George Prochnik


George Prochnik’s essays, poetry and fiction have appeared in numerous journals. He is editor-at-large for Cabinet Magazine and won the National Jewish Book Award for The Impossible Exile.

Erica Wagner


Erica Wagner’s latest book is Chief Engineer: Washington Roebling, The Man Who Built the Brooklyn Bridge (Bloomsbury). Erica was the literary editor of the London Times for seventeen years and is now a contributing writer for the New Statesman and consulting literary editor for Harper’s Bazaar. She is the author of Ariel’s GiftSeizure (Faber & Faber), the short story collection Gravity (Granta) and the editor of First Light (Unbound), a celebration of the work of Alan Garner. She received the Eccles British Library Writer’s Award in 2014, and she is a lecturer in creative writing at Goldsmiths.

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