The Fab Four: Tracy Chevalier, Jeremy Gavron, Charlotte Mendelson & William Sutcliffe

Tracy Chevalier, Jeremy Gavron, Charlotte Mendelson, William Sutcliffe

07/03/2004 11:00 am
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In September 2003 the Jewish Chronicle published its list of the “Fine Nine” most talented young Jewish authors in Britain today.
In this session, four of these sparkling new voices came together with Natasha Lehrer, Deputy Editor of the Jewish Quarterly, to talk about their writing, Jewish humour and their feelings on receiving this cultural accolade. They all showed some interesting touching points. All for example felt there was something comical about this Granta rip-off award! And none of them wanted merely to be pigeonholed as a Jewish writer.
Tracy Chevalier


Tracy Chevalier is a Washington-born prize-winning novelist. Her recent projects include not only her new novel, At the Edge of the Orchard, but also another novel inspired by Othello for the Hogarth Press, and editing – as well as contributing to – Reader, I Married Him, a collection of original short-stories inspired by Jane Eyre.

William Sutcliffe

William Sutcliffe was born in London in 1971. He is the author of five previous novels: the international bestseller Are You Experienced?; The Love Hexagon; New Boy; Bad Influence and, most recently, Whatever Makes You Happy. His work has been translated into more than 20 languages. He lives in Edinburgh

Jeremy Gavron


Jeremy Gavron is the author of two non-fiction books and three novels, including The Book of Israel, winner of the Encore Award, and An Acre of Barren Ground. A former foreign correspondent in Africa and India, he now lives in London and teaches at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina.

Charlotte Mendelson


Charlotte Mendelson has written four novels, one non-fiction book about her tragic gardening obsession, Rhapsody in Green, much literary journalism and work for radio, and is Gardening Correspondent for the New Yorker. Her most recent novel, Almost English, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction. When We Were Bad was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction, and was chosen as a book of the year in the Observer, Guardian, Sunday Times, New Statesman and Spectator. Her second novel, Daughters of Jerusalem, won both the Somerset Maugham Award and the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize, and she was shortlisted for the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year award.