Ulysses Revisited

Howard Jacobson, Henry Goodman, Derbhle Crotty

26/03/2012 4:45 pm
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For Howard Jacobson, James Joyce’s Ulysses is the greatest Jewish novel of the 20th century; for Henry Goodman the novel that hugely articulated and reshaped his artistic hopes and identity as an actor.

Together they revisited, discussed and read from the iconic text published 90 years ago this February. They contended that Bloom, this great hero of consciousness and inaction, weakness and masochism, belongs in the great tradition of comic fiction. They also looked at Bloom as a prophetic figure, the outsider, who as a Jew, can guide others out of trauma because of his intimacy with suffering. Derbhle Crotty joined them to read passages illustrating Molly’s complex relationship with her husband. The session included a dynamic look at “interior monologue”.

Derbhle Crotty

Derbhle Crotty played Portia alongside Henry Goodman\'s Shylock. Her theatre credits include: A Month in the Country, The Plough and the Stars, Bailegangaire, (Abbey and Peacock Theatres), Portia Coughlan (Royal Court Co-production), The Well of the Saints (Edinburgh Festival and Perth), The Mai and Katie Roche. Other theatre credits include The Alice Trilogy (Royal Court), The Home Place, Dancing at Lughnasa (Gate Theatre), The Playboy of the Western World, Summerfolk, The Merchant of Venice (National Theatre, London), The Weir (Royal Court on tour), Little Eyolf, Camino Real, Hamlet (RSC), Playing the Wife (Chichester), Royal Supreme (Plymouth), Miss Julie (Vesuvius) and Measure for Measure (Galloglas).

Henry Goodman

Henry Goodman is a multi-award-winning actor, twice recipient of the Laurence Olivier award and winner of the London Critics’ Circle Award. He has recently starred in Trevor Nunn’s Volpone.

Howard Jacobson

Howard Jacobson is a multi-award-winning writer of 13 novels and five works of non-fiction, as well as a regular contributor to major newspapers and journals, including a regular column for The Independent. He won the Man Booker Prize for The Finkler Question.

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