David Pryce-Jones

David Pryce-Jones was born in Vienna in 1936. At Oxford, he read history. His literary career started with the Financial Times, then the Spectator and finally the Daily Telegraph, for whom he covered the 1967 and 1973 wars in the Middle East. His many non-fiction books include The Closed Circle, an account of the Arabs and The War that Never Was, about the collapse of the Soviet Union. He is also the author of ten novels and his latest book is an auobiography, Fault Lines. He is a Senior Editor of National Review.
The Prime Ministers
The Prime Ministers has been called “the ultimate insider’s account” of politics and decision-making by five Israeli prime ministers since the founding of the state in 1948. Top political aide Yehuda Avner worked beside Levi Eshkol, Golda Meir, Yitzhak Rabin, Menachem Begin and Shimon Peres over 25 years. He was present for major moments including Begin’s decision to bomb a nuclear reactor in Iraq in 1981 and Rabin’s handling of the 1976 mission to rescue Israeli hostages at ...
Fault Lines

In his memoir, David Pryce-Jones, former literary editor of The FT and Spectator and author of several major works, reveals his complex origins: born in Vienna, he is the Eton and Oxford-educated son of writer Alan Pryce-Jones, while his mother, Therese Fould-Springer, was a Viennese heiress. He talks about his life, both very English and singularly exotic, with journalist Jonathan Foreman.

Anti-Semitism
In his powerful new polemic, Anti-Semitism, renowned novelist and screenwriter Frederic Raphael considers why intense hostility has been directed so relentlessly towards Jews for more than two millennia. Frederic Raphael is joined by David Pryce-Jones in a penetrating analysis of this crucial perennial question.