Jeremy Gavron

Jeremy Gavron is the author of two non-fiction books and three novels, including The Book of Israel, winner of the Encore Award, and An Acre of Barren Ground. A former foreign correspondent in Africa and India, he now lives in London and teaches at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina.

Football across Borders (The Talk)
Assaf Gavron, the author of CrocAttack, Uri Sheradsky, editor of the monthly sports magazine, Shem Hamisehak, both members of the Israeli writers’ football team and their counterpart on the English team, Jeremy Gavron, (An Acre of Barren Ground) and Simon Kuper (Why England Lose) are joined by Jerrold Kessel, the author of Goals for Galilee, the story of a tiny Arab soccer club which won the Israeli State Cup discussed the ways in which football can bring together people, players and au...
Stephan Mendel-Enk: Oh Sweden! Oh Israel!
Around the time of Jacob’s bar mitzvah, his mother leaves his father for another man, a Swedish goy. It’s 1987, the first Intifada is about to break out in Israel, and the Jews of Gothenburg are under a certain amount of strain. Stephan Mendel-Enk came to Jewish Book Week to present his acclaimed first novel, a portrait by turns comic and tragic of a family going through divorce and the divided loyalties of Diaspora Jewish life. “Mendel-Enk is brilliant in his humorous, d...
A Woman on the Edge of Time

Jeremy Gavron’s searching account of his mother, who was rarely talked about after her death, documents the too-short life of this extraordinary woman, as he pieces together the events and pressures that led to Hannah Gavron’s suicide when he was just four. Jeremy Gavron discusses his deeply personal and moving memoir with columnist, writer and sociologist Anne Karpf.

Dark Stories

In Rick Gekoski’s Darke, the protagonist eschews the outside world, turning to philosophers and poets to make sense of humanity’s tragic essence. But just as he prepares to abjure life entirely, he is offered a chance of salvation. Jeremy Gavron’s Felix Culpa, is a stylistically experimental noir fiction, posing the question: whose stories deserve to be told? And whose words should do the telling?