Gamechangers Series Monday 11 January - Monday 22 February | Tickets now on sale

Miri Rubin

Miri Rubin is an historian of the religious cultures of Europe with special interest in social relations, and attitudes to Jews.
Cities of Strangers
In her latest book Miri Rubin illuminates life in European towns and cities for both the settled population and the newcomers who joined them between 1000 and 1500 AD. Some city-states enjoyed considerable autonomy and invited groups from afar, as well as professionals such as physicians, notaries and judges to settle and help produce good urban living. But this benign cycle began to break down after regular occurrences of the plague from 1350. She will be in conversation wit...
Jesus and the Jews
Why is Jesus the source of fascination in modern Jewish thought? How has Christianity changed Jewish practice and how did Judaism shape the medieval imagination? We discovered the Jews who insisted on Jesus’ Jewish-ness, the movement to identify Jesus as an Aryan, and how an examination of the Virgin Mary can offer a glimpse into the links and catastrophic breaks between the Abrahamic faiths. Professors Susannah Heschel and Miri Rubin, two leading scholars in the field offered...
Fania Oz-Salzberger: Textline, Not Bloodline How did the Jews Remain Jews?
Why are words so important to so many Jews? Historian Fania Oz-Salzberger discusses Jews and Words, which she wrote together with her father, the celebrated Israeli novelist Amos Oz. They roam the gamut of Jewish history to explain the integral relationship of Jews and words. Their book traces a rich heritage of the spoken and written word from the Bible to today. Through a blend of storytelling, scholarship, conversation and argument it explores a “textline” that forms a l...
Keiron Pim and Miri Rubin Medieval Norwich
How was life for Jews in medieval England? Recent scholarship and a groundbreaking new translation of Hebrew poetry from Norwich shed light on a dark period of Anglo-Jewish history. Keiron Pim and Miri Rubin discuss the Jew Meir of Norwich and the writings of a monk, Thomas of Monmouth, the first Christian narrative to link Jews to child murder. Into the Light the Medieva...
The Cairo Genizah
For a millennium the Jewish community of Old Cairo placed their old books and other writings, from marriage contracts and love letters, to children’s drawings and even drafts from the hands of Maimonides, in a genizah, or storeroom, of the Ben Ezra Synagogue. In 1896 Dr Solomon Schechter, a Talmudic scholar, was granted permission by the Jewish community of Egypt to take all he liked to Cambridge. He ‘liked it all’ and took 193,000 manuscripts. This treasure trove from Cairo...