Alain de Botton

Alain de Botton\'s bestselling books include Religion for Atheists, How Proust Can Change Your Life, The Art of Travel, and The Architecture of Happiness. He lives in London and founded The School of Life (www.theschooloflife.com) and Living Architecture (www.living-architecture.co.uk). www.alaindebotton.com.
Status Anxiety: Alain de Bot
There are few more powerful desires than the wish to be thought of as a success, worthy of dignity and respect. We long for status and dread its opposite. But such aspirations and anxieties are rarely spoken about, or at least not without sarcasm, embarrassment or condemnation. In Status Anxiety (2004) leading philosopher Alain de Botton tackles our worries about status, success and failure. In this session, in conversation with award-winning columnist Deborah Orr, he discussed the ori...
The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work
We spend much of our lives at work – but surprisingly little gets written about what makes work both one of the most exciting and most painful of all our activities. Alain de Botton came to Jewish Book Week to present his ninth book, The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work. This is an exploration of the joys and perils of the modern workplace, evoking what other people get up to all day – and night – to make the frenzied contemporary world function. With a philosophical eye and his characteri...
Community Buildings: Building Community

One of the causes of both happiness and misery is the quality of our environment. Alain de Botton tells us about his new Living Architecture project, dedicated to the promotion and enjoyment of world-class modern architecture. Alex Lifschutz described the new Jewish Community Centre for London building and the impact that it will have. They spoke about the way beautiful buildings can alter our perception of self and community and the way we think about both ourselves and our communities.

Alain de Botton on News

The News: A User’s Manual looks at the peculiar place that “the news” occupies in our lives. de Botton notes that we invest it with an authority which used to be the preserve of religion. But what does it do for us? Mixing current affairs with philosophy, de Botton offers a guide to the precautions we should take before venturing anywhere near the news and the “noise” it generates.