Shalom Auslander

Shalom Auslander is the internationally-acclaimed novelist and memoirist of such books as Foreskin's Lament, Mother For Dinner and Hope: A Tragedy, which critics on both sides of the Atlantic have named the funniest book of the decade. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Esquire and many others. He lives, sadly, in Los Angeles.
Dangerous Writing
Is Shalom Auslander taking the name of God in vain when imagining Him as a big chicken? Is Naomi Alderman’s story of a lesbian relationship in Hendon blasphemous? Brought up as an orthodox Jew in New York, Shalom Auslander has produced a collection of short stories, Beware of God, which is viciously funny and irreverent. Naomi Alderman’s novel, Disobedience, is about a young woman who has turned her back on her father – a respected ra...
God Wrestling

Shalom Auslander is angry and scared. Angry at God, at his family, his orthodox upbringing, at the world we live in. Scared, because as hard as he may try, he is still a believer and convinced that a vengeful and cruel God will punish him for his irreverence. The result is as profoundly dark as it is hilariously funny.

Six Word Memoirs
Hemingway’s legendary challenge to write a novel in six words—”For sale: baby shoes, never worn”— has unintentionally created one of the hottest modern literary trends. In 2006, SMITH Magazine gave the six-word story a personal twist, calling it the Six-Word Memoir. Now, more than half a million Six-Word Memoirs on SMITHmag.net and a bestselling book series later, SMITH Magazine comes to celebrate the release of its “Oy! Only Six? Why Not More?” — Six Words on the Jewi...
Hope: A Tragedy

Darkly hilarious, dangerously subversive and extraordinarily bold, Shalom Auslander delivered a hilarious and disquieting examination of the burdens and abuse of history. The hero of Hope: A Tragedy had hoped to escape the past, history, wars and genocide in a rural US town but nothing happens as expected. We heard from one of the most original, wittiest and darkest voices on the Jewish American scene.

Isaac Bashevis Singer: A long, long way
Featuring access to the Arena film Isaac Singer’s Nightmare and Mrs Pupko’s Beard Part of Arena at Jewish Book Week  “I wouldn’t say that Yiddish is dead, neither would I say that Yiddish is blooming. I would say that Yiddish is sick. But in our history, between being sick and dying is a long, long way…” Isaac Bashevis Singer, Isaac Singer’s Nightmare and Mrs Pupko’s B...