Marina Benjamin

Marina Benjamin is a writer and editor working mainly in narrative non-fiction and memoir, producing books, essays and journalism. Her latest books, The Middlepause (2016) and Insomnia (2018) were published in the UK, US and Australia and have been translated into eight languages. In 2020 she edited Garden Among Fires: A lockdown anthology published by Dodo Ink. Most recently, her feminist manifesto 'Soma' appeared in Trauma: Essays on Art nad Mental Health (2021). Marina is also a senior editor at Aeon Magazine.
Remembering Babylon

Naim Kattan grew up in a multicultural Baghdad as did Marina Benjamin’s grandmother. A violent pogrom shook their world in 1941 and eventually 130, 000 Jews were airlifted out of Iraq and scattered across the globe in the early fifties. The two authors discussed colonial Baghdad, the political forces that shape the country today and the fate of its Jewish diaspora.

Momentous Years: 1947-1948
In 1947, Elisabeth Åsbrink, previous winner of the August Prize, intertwines global events with key moments from her personal history as the daughter of a Hungarian survivor. This was the year when Orwell commenced 1984, Israel was about to be born and Dior created the New Look. Writer and global analyst Jonathan Fenby’s forthcoming book Crucible turns the spotlight on 1948, from the beginnings of the Cold War and China’s civil war to the fall out of the creation of India and Pakistan....
Descent into Darkness
In Insomnia, Marina Benjamin has produced an unsettling account of an unsettling condition, treating our inability to sleep not as a disorder, but as an existential experience that can electrify our understanding of ourselves, and of creativity and love. Lisa Appignanesi, in Everyday Madness, writes of the rage she experienced when her partner of 32 years died. In this brave examination of an ‘ordinary enough’ death and its aftermath, she scrutinises her own and ...
The Wolf of Baghdad

“The belief is current among Baghdadi Jews that the wolf keeps away spirits and demons.”
David Sassoon, scholar, 1917

Carol Isaac’s graphic memoir of a lost homeland revisits the old Jewish Quarter of 1940s Baghdad, home to a third of the city’s population which witnessed the death or expulsion of almost its entire community of 150,000. Journeying among its ghostly former inhabitants, she brings to life a lost world.

Jacob’s Advice
Described by the Daily Mail as “a thoughtful paean to Paris”, Jacob’s Advice – the second novel from Byron Easy author Jude Cook – is set against a backdrop of nationalism, the Charlie Hebdo attack and the resurgence of antisemitism, as protagonist Larry Frost searches for proof of his hoped-for Jewish identity. An editor for The Literary Consultancy and a book critic for The Spectator, The Guardian and Literary Review, Jude ...